7 Reasons to Buy Canadian-Made


Did you know that 45% of consumers will go out of their way to buy Canadian-made products?  Why would someone want to go out of their way just to buy a Canadian made product you ask?  Well, we’ve compiled this list of some really good reasons!

  1. Creating and giving jobs back to Canadians, thus keeping our dollars at home.  Independent Canadian businesses provide 77% of all private jobs in Canada.[1]
  2. Quality control.  Canadian manufacturers are highly regarded for their strict quality control standards. “Made in Canada” has earned its reputation of being high quality and durable.   
  3. Direct communication.  The barriers that once existed between Canadian manufacturer and consumer are diminishing and never before has it been easier to directly communicate with the manufacturer to have any questions or requests answered. 
  4. Products from Canada produce less carbon footprint for you to receive the goods, which is a tremendous aide to the environment. For example, a product made in Canada requires 25 times less transportation than a similar product made overseas. 2
  5. No duty or brokerage fees are needed to bring the product into the country, which would otherwise need to be added to the cost of the product and therefore potentially making the product more expensive than its Canadian-made equivalent. 
  6. Health and safety are carefully regulated in Canada, as opposed to overseas plants.  We can feel good about buying products made in Canada!
  7. Supports our communities.  When we buy Canadian we are contributing to the enrichment of our communities and could be contributing to the survival of a struggling local family business. 

Ready to start buying more Canadian-made products?  Be sure to look for products from these Canadian manufacturers when browsing our catalogue or shopping online!

GemexDavis Group
TOPS Office ProductsAvery
Continental Filing SystemsHilroy
Empack3M
Global Furniture

Sources:

[1] http://canadianentrepreneurtraining.com/six-statistics-about-small-business-and-entrepreneurship-in-canada/

2 https://buycanadianfirst.ca/why-buy-canadian-first

12 Great Uses For A Label Machine


A label machine is not just for super-organized, anti-clutter fanatics.  There are so many uses for a label machine in the office, here are some ideas you can start right away!

1. Learn a new language

Label common items with its name in the language you would like to learn.  Seeing the words daily will help you to learn that new language in no time!

2. Identify personal belongings

Stapler always go missing? Someone always using your mug?  Put your name on it with a label so everyone knows it’s yours!

3. Binder Clips

Keep your paper documents neat and tidy by grouping like documents with a binder clip.  Label the binder clip so you know what types of documents are in that pile.  You can also pre-label binder clips and use them to indicate action items like “Please Sign” or “To File”.   

4. Signs in the office 

Create a neat and simplistic label for you inbox and outbox.  You can also use labels to post subtle reminder messages, like the long-standing struggle to not leave dishes in the sink!  

5. Organize your breakroom

Indicate where dishes, cups and cutlery should go so that evertyhing is put back in its proper place. 

6. Cords & Cables

Ever reach behind your computer or TV and are overwhelmed with the number of cords back there, and finding the one you need seems like a daunting task?  Eliminate the confusion by labelling each cord or cable with its function and quickly locate the one you’re looking for.

7. File Folders

Title your file folders neatly and legibly by using a label.  This also creates a nice uniform look to your files, and you can take your efficiency even further by using various colours of label tape to identify types of files.  For example, all personnel files can be pink while invoices could be in yellow.

8. Inventory Management

Create a label for each item in your supplies cabinet and not only will people be able to quickly locate what they are looking for, but you’ll also quickly be able to identify which supplies are running low and need to be ordered. 

9. Binders

Quickly identify which binder you’re looking for and create a uniform appearance with the use of a label on the spine.  Using various colours of label tape is also an excellent way to keep organized. 

10. Flash Drives

Never have to wonder again what is on that flash drive by labelling it.  This also helps to reduce security risk by no longer having to plug in an unknown flash drive to determine what is on it.

11. Name Badge

Create a name badge quickly by using a label machine.  This works particularly well in creating guest badges for the office.   

12. Storage Boxes

Never again have to guess what’s in that storage box, and need to pull it down in order to see what’s in it when you use labels on the outside!   

First Sit and Stand Experience: A Week Long Study


Hello everyone,

Nem here, the Web Marketing Specialist. Hope your journey to a healthier workplace is going according to plan. As part of this month’s workplace wellness blog we thought it would be worthwhile to do a mini-study on myself, by myself (not sure if this one will be a part of any peer reviewed journals) with regards to the sit and stand workstations.

Sit & Stand Workstation Study

Many of us at our office got outfitted with these options and we’ve been trying to implement a good balance between sitting and standing. My personal goal was to reach a 50-50 balance. And as a little background on my daily activity; I do not do much moving around – my tasks consist mainly of working on the computer, unless we have to move tables, throw out old equipment or carry stuff into the storage room (Raf, the graphic designer and I are the internal moving team). The only times I get up are for lunch, grabbing coffee or restroom breaks.

 

 

Below is a chart where you will find my sitting vs. standing schedule over a week. You will notice I only hit that goal once during the week, and as a first timer using a sit & stand extension I think that is not too bad. Most of the time I would forget to stand (caught up in doing work) and then I would have to make up the time by standing for prolonged periods of time as opposed to doing timely and balanced intervals.

Weekly Chart: Sitting vs. Standing

Summary of my experiences during this week:

1. Making a daily schedule of when to sit and stand helps remind you to actually stand.

We all get caught up in our responsibilities and our brains have been basically wired to sit (if your job is computer heavy like mine) at work. I made a schedule for each day and followed it (for the most part) to gradually increase my standing time.

2. Doing short intervals between sitting and standing is much better than trying to stand or sit for longer periods.

When I would sit for too long, I tried to balance it out by standing for the same (if not longer) amount of time. Let me tell you, your feet get sore! It’s not too bad but at some point you start to lean on one leg, then the other to avoid soreness. I found myself shuffling my feet, anything but to stay stationary. We even got a Steppie (balancing board for your feet while you stand, it rocks left and right) that I used but it elevated me past my monitors so I went back to alternating my legs while standing. Short intervals > long periods of time.

3. My focus increased while standing.

Usually I would lock in and chip away at a specific task continuously. Perhaps it was the increased blood flow as the manufacturers claim, or it could have been the fact that when you stand to work it’s almost like raising your hand in class. You are put on the spot to answer (or ask a question) and “everyone” is watching. Probably a little subconscious trick of the brain to get you into another gear.

4. Another interesting thing I found is that if any of my colleagues near me were standing, we would be more collaborative (or communicative).

Being eye level with someone (as opposed to being separated by a cubicle wall) made it easier to ask a question directly while working instead of sending an email and waiting for a response. Actually the same case can be made for colleagues in different locations of the office. I found myself walking over and having a conversation (assuming they were not busy or in meetings) regarding certain tasks as opposed to just emailing back and forth.

5. First thing in the morning and first thing after lunch were NOT my standing times.

I would usually take the 1st hour after coming into the office and about 30-45 minutes after lunch to sit. Any other time of the day was fair game.


So there you have it – my initial experiences with the sit & stand workstation on the road to a healthier workday. I would love to hear if anyone else has had a similar or different experience using one of these. I would also be very interested in hearing from people who don’t necessarily work at a computer all day – do you find sitting breaks necessary sometimes?