Tips for National Bike to Work Day


When’s the last time you dusted off that old bike in your garage? May 19 is National Bike to Work Day and to celebrate, we think you should give your two-wheeler a tune-up and take it on a field trip… to work. It might seem intimidating at first, but we’re here to boost your confidence and give you all the tools you need to get to and from work safely.

National Bike to Work Day

How to bike to work safely

No matter where you live, bike safety is a big issue. The idea of competing with hoards of rush hour traffic can be intimidating, even for seasoned cyclists.

To begin, visit Google Maps to find route recommendations, including designated bike paths that you can follow.

Next, brush up on the rules of the road. Just like motorists, cyclists must stop at red lights, yield to pedestrians and signal their turns. But unlike cars, bicycles are often excepted on one-way streets. Check your municipal bike code for local rules. For example, in Toronto, you must have a working bell and bike light. And though not mandatory, we can’t stress the importance of a helmet enough.

The benefits of biking to work

Decrease your travel time. Really. For those living in bumper-to-bumper driving areas, this is especially true.

Get fit. This part is a no-brainer. By cycling for just three hours a week — or less than 20-minutes each way to work — you can decrease your risk of heart disease by 50%.

Boost brain power. Not only has daily exercise been proven to prevent cognitive decline and memory loss, but in a study, two-thirds of employers said that the cyclists in their office were more productive than non-cyclists. Biking to work is just one of many ways we encourage our employees to work well.

Decrease your ecological footprint. Transportation — cars, trucks and buses — accounts for nearly 30% of North America’s greenhouse gas emissions. Taking two wheels to work instead of four is an easy way to do your part in slashing that statistic.

Proper Waste Disposal at the Office


Properly Disposing of Waste at Office

If your workplace is like ours, you go through a lot of waste. That means, between lunches, office supplies and old electronics, you’re sending a lot of garbage to already over-burdened landfills.

Meanwhile, at home, many of us have made changes. We’re becoming waste-conscious, recycling and composting, even adopting zero- and low-waste lifestyles.

How can that translate to the office? Through more conscious day-to-day choices, you can easily reduce your office’s environmental impact. Here’s a guide to get you there.

Old electronics

Have any ancient PCs collecting dust at your office? Don’t throw them in the dumpster! Already, 140,000 tonnes of electronic waste ends up in Canadian landfills every year. These items contain valuable materials that can be re-used to create new products. But they can be tricky to dispose of.

Luckily, there are businesses out there to help you bridge the gap. These differ across provinces and territories. For example, in Ontario, Best Buy accepts things like old computers, TVs, phones and batteries. You can also opt for a service through the Electronic Products Recycling Association, like Recycle my Electronics.

Toner and ink

Here, many local suppliers have you covered. Check to see if you can return your cartridges where you buy them.

Paper and Cardboard

Cardboard and paper can be recycled four-to-five times without loss of quality or strength. Still, it’s important to recycle each of them properly.

Cardboard is naturally biodegradable so, if you have your own compost at the office, this can be shredded and tossed in. Otherwise, for non-soiled cardboard, recycling is your best bet. Break down boxes and large pieces, and tie them together into a tight bundle when you leave them at the curb.

The recycling bin is your best destination for most paper. Even sticky notes, which you may have wondered about, are usually recyclable. Local recycling plants are able to remove the adhesive. But, stop before you throw away that soiled napkin! Keep reading for tips on proper disposal of food waste.

Food waste

Most paper in the office will be bound for the recycling bin, but soiled paper is a different story. Greasy paper plates and used napkins can be composted along with most food items.

Creative Ways to Use Chalk


Whether you’re trying to stay busy on a rainy day, looking for ways to improve your home and office, or you’ve simply got a lot of chalk on your hands, we’re here to help. Chalk is a great addition to any arts and crafts session, but it can stretch so much further. Here are just a few ways that we love to use chalk.

Creative Ways to Use Chalk

  1. Make a chalk wall. This is a functional, fun addition to any space. We love chalk board walls in the kitchen for writing grocery lists and messages. Use regular chalk for erasable use, and create sections or headings with more long-lasting pastel chalk.
  2. Change your hair colour. Use chalk pastels to give a temporary, funky new look to your hair. Housing a Forest has all the details for you. Try it out on your own hair, or set it up for your kid’s next slumber party.
  3. Remove grease and sweat stains. You just spilled grease on your leather jacket, and your new white shirt already has a sweaty neck rim. Chalk to the rescue! Apply chalk to any area that needs a little lift, let it set for a few minutes to absorb the oil and then wipe it away.
  4. Keep metalware — like silver and tools — pristine. You just learned that chalk absorbs grease and oil, but it also absorbs moisture from the air. This is good news for your silver — and everything in your jewellery and toolbox boxes — because a few sticks of chalk will draw moisture away from your precious metals, keeping them rust- and tarnish-free.
  5. Give your walls a makeover. Painting the house or office is time-consuming. But nobody likes the look of scratched-up paint. When you’re in-between paintings, use chalk — and especially pastel chalk — to hide nicks on your wall. Just find a chalk colour that matches your wall, and keep a few sticks on hand.