How to Pack a Package


Whether you’re moving a package from one office to another, shipping a product to a customer or sending a gift to your Aunt; the same methods of packing a package should typically apply. The overall goal is to protect the item from point A to point B in its journey, in the most efficient and sustainable way possible. We have some tips that might help you out next time to pack that package in confidence!

Choosing the right material:

  • Quality counts! New boxes are the smartest to put your package in for durability and safety of your item(s). But for a more sustainable approach, recycled boxes are just fine as long as their integrity is still solid and there are no rips or holes.
  • Packing tape is an important part of packing a package. You may want to consider the many different types of tape, and which one serves your purpose of packing best. Typically for a package, it is the best practice to use a 2-inch wide variety of packing tape that reinforces the bottom of the box and all of the seams.
  • Add cushioning and filler material such as: bubble wrap, airbags, newspaper, tissue paper, foam or cardboard inserts when appropriately needed to secure your items within the package and prevent any damage.
  • For understanding shipping requirements and general packaging guidelines, you can reference FedEx’s How to Pack Guideline for more helpful information.

Using the right box/container:

  • Try not to use a box that is too big for your item, rather select one that is just slightly bigger than the item itself. This allows enough room for packing materials to protect your item, but also restricts any unnecessary movement your item in a box that is too big. Plus, the smaller the box or envelope, the less costly it could be to ship your package!
  • Weight matters, the heavier the product, the stronger the packaging material needs to be. When in doubt, err on the side of caution and use a new, sturdy box as opposed to a recycled box, and double-up on the packing tape when sealing the box and all its seams.
  • Be mindful of where the label is placed, ensuring it is clearly legible and in a spot that can be easily seen, especially if the item is fragile.
  • Here are some additional suggestions from Canada Post of outer packaging and packing materials for a safe delivery of your items.

Things to Avoid:

  • Don’t over fill your package, and keep it organized. Heavy and crammed items can cause damage to adjacent objects, and also themselves.
  • Make sure the address is correct and placed properly on the package before shipping to avoid misconceptions of delivery destinations. Also clearly mark the name of the recipient and/or department to ensure the package gets to the appropriate person once it arrives at its destination.
  • Remove all other labels or old addresses from the box, and scratch out any additional markings on the box that cannot be removed with a black marker.

Ship Smart:

  • Research your carrier by comparing services and rates. If you ship packages regularly, consider registering for a business account with your chosen carrier to take advantage of any discounted rates.
  • If your package is heavier than average (55lb or over), give your carrier notice in advance with a “Heavy” label.
  • It is always a good idea to write “fragile” or “this side up” in order for your package to avoid risk of damaging.
  • Keep your package simple and tidy, avoid use of strings and cords that could get caught in shipping machines.

We hope this was helpful and you will be able to pack that package in confidence with the assurance that your items arrive safe & secure!

You Can Never Have Too Many Pens


I’m sitting in the boardroom at our monthly staff meeting, listening to Aditi go over our reports, when my pen suddenly runs dry.

I search frantically through my purse for a backup, trying to memorize the numbers Aditi rhymes off so I can be sure to jot them down for review.

Brigid, who is sitting in the chair across from me, slides a pen across the boardroom table and smiles warmly. I mouth the words “thank you,” and start scribbling away to catch up.

But I can’t help becoming distracted by the pen’s smooth, soft grip and archival quality. It glides across my notepad, leaving a smudge-free line of black ink behind.

woman-writing

Aditi’s voice trails off and everyone starts to gather up their things and head for the door. I follow closely behind Brigid, handing her pen back to her.

“Keep it,” Brigid says. “I just got a pack of 12 from the Office Plus e-flyer.”

“Thanks!” I respond. “I’m going to have to get some for myself.”

“It’s the Jimnie Gel Rollerball Pen,” Brigid tells me, pulling the flyer up on her tablet as we walk back to our offices. “You save when you buy a pack of 12.”

I glance over her shoulder as she flips through the pages, stopping her as she scrolls past images of notepads. “I’m running low on these too,” I tell her.

“I like the Recycled Perforated Pads myself,” Brigid says. “High quality legal rule on one side and blank on the other – and made with 100% recycled paper.”

“Sounds perfect!”

“I’ll email you the flyer,” she says over her shoulder as we reach my office door and she continues down the hallway.

I sit down at my desk and carefully place Brigid’s pen in my penholder. Minutes later, I hear the familiar ding coming from my laptop and Brigid’s name pops up in my inbox.

I waste no time finding the pens and pads and sending in my order. Who knew you could get so excited about note taking? I decide to purchase two boxes of 12 – just in case someone asks to “borrow” a pen at the next board meeting. It doesn’t hurt to have a backup. Plus, you can never have too many pens.

Preparing for a Printer Failure


I’m walking by the printing room where Brigid is finishing off the last of our office summer barbecue invitations when I hear the noise. It’s the kind of sound that makes the muscles in your back tighten up – a loud crunching as the paper grinds up into a crumpled and shredded mess between the rollers.

The machine exhales in three high-pitched beeps and the small screen on the front starts flashing.

Brigid looks at me with wide eyes. “Well, that can’t be good.”

She hurries over and reads the words on the touch panel aloud, “Printer fail.”

I follow along and look over her shoulder just as Andy walks in behind me.

“What’s all the commotion in here?” He asks.

Business lady with a printer

“The printer appears to be kaput.” Brigid responds, after checking the paper tray and opening the rear access door to peer inside. She pulls out the torn invitation, which is now covered in ink splatter and not in any way legible.

Normally, after removing the jam the printer would come back to life. But the machine has now completely shut down and refuses to respond to Brigid’s prompting, as she methodically pushes a combination of buttons.

“Ah, yes. It was only a matter of time.” Andy sighs, as if he had been expecting this for a while.

I eye him curiously.

“The printer has been… uhh…disagreeing with me quite often lately,” he says. I can’t help but notice a hint of guilt in his tone. “I was prepared for this moment, which is why I went ahead and placed an order for the All-in-One Inkjet Printer in this month’s Office Plus flyer.”

“With the instant rebate, we saved 55 dollars,” he says, “I figured we couldn’t go wrong.”

Good recovery. I raise my eyebrows, impressed by his proactive efforts.

“It should be in tomorrow, actually.” He smiles.

Brigid lets out a sigh of relief. “Ah, you’re my hero, Andy,” she says, adding, “I never thought I’d hear myself saying that.”

He gives her a wink and struts back out the doorway. I can’t help but laugh. “Oh Andy,” I mutter as I turn to leave the room.

Brigid chuckles behind me. “I can only imagine what the office barbecue will bring!”