How to choose the right planner for you


Choosing the right planner or calendar

Using a paper planner in this digital age can have some unique advantages. Using a planner that works for you, can help to keep you more organized and productive, which in turn enables you to complete tasks more efficiently. A planner can also help you to declutter your task list and keep on top of appointments and this in turn helps to manage your stress and mental health! Sometimes writing everything down, planning your day, and staying organized can actually help to boost motivation as well. And what feels better than checking everything off of your To Do list by the end of the day!

For such a seemingly small purchase, a planner is a big commitment. It’s your personal assistant for one full year, so it’s important to choose correctly so you don’t miss out on the most important things in your life. But there are so many options. How do you know which planner is right for you? We’ve broken down some important pieces of choosing a planner below!

First – think about how you like to plan – some things to think of:
Do you plan out every minute or do you just need to know when certain appointments fall?
Do you depend on lists?
Do you set goals? Do you want to start setting them?
Do you have a routine? If not, do you want to create one?
What isn’t working with your current planner, if you use one?
How portable would you like it to be?

Think about how you want it bound.
Do you want to be able to move things around? Do you like the idea of a bound, journal like book or does a spiral bound planner appeal to you?

How do you want it to look?
Remember, it’s what you’ll be looking at for a whole year or longer. So consider the style. Think about color, texture, picture or graphic. Do you want to be able to change the cover easily or not?

Some Types of planners:

Daily vs. Weekly

If you want an hour-by-hour view of your day, a daily planner is right for you. It will keep all of your appointments in one easy-to-find place. But if you’d rather take a quick scan to see what’s on for today without breaking it down hour-by-hour, a weekly planner is what you need.

Bullet Planner

Whether you need to get a better handle on your to-do list or want an outlet to help you relax, a bullet journal can help. Think of it as a next-level diary for not only writing but also drawing. Instead of blank, lined pages, or dated pages, a bullet journal contains sections to log daily to-dos, keep a monthly or weekly calendar, jot down notes, track both physiological and mental health, and record both short- and long-term goals.

Some features to think about:

Tabs

Need to flip ahead and see what’s coming up in October? Or do you want to keep your business and personal separate? Look for a planner with tabs. With a glance and a flip, you will quickly find the section you need.

Pockets

For the person with print-outs, receipts and business cards in every jacket, purse or wallet, a planner with pockets is right for you. It will keep all of your important documents in one place.

Note Fields

It’s the all-purpose planner. If you cringe at carrying an armful of notebooks, calendars and planners to the meeting, look for a planner with lots of note space.

Size

Want to journal, stay organized and keep contacts in one place? Go for a large planner. It may seem hefty to lug around, but when you consider all of the items you won’t need anymore — like a date book and note pad — it’s actually a concise way to go. If you want something that can fit into your clutch, forgo the extra features and look for a simple daily or weekly planner.

#LeftHandersDay – August 13!


Barack Obama. Paul McCartney. Oprah Winfrey. Tracy from accounting. These are just a few of the great left-handers that have impacted our lives. And on August 13, we’re paying tribute to them.

Happy #LeftHandersDay

After years of struggling with scissors and can-openers, southpaws are getting the recognition and respect they deserve. It’s Left-Handers Day! And to celebrate, we’re sharing a few things that make lefties so special.

  • 13% of the world’s population is left-handed. And it’s not by random luck. Scientists believe that the trait is genetic, meaning it runs in certain families.
  • Mensa says that 20% of its brainy members are lefties.
  • Lefties are better drivers. According to one study, being left-handed makes you 10% more likely to pass your driving test on the first try.
  • Of the team of five that developed the first-ever Mac computer, 80% were left-handed.
  • If you’re left-handed, you likely earn 15% more than your right-handed peers. Studies show that this may have to do with lefties being well-suited to leadership and entrepreneurial roles.
  • Though roughly one-in-ten people are left-handed, one-quarter of Apollo astronauts were lefties.
  • According to the ancient Zuni people, left-handedness was a sign of wisdom and good luck.

The Power of Writing It Down: 5 Reasons to Put Pen to Paper


5 Reasons to Write Things Down

Did you know – Writing on physical paper leads to stronger brain activity? Writing by hand increases brain activity in recall tasks over taking notes on a tablet or smartphone. Additionally, those who write by hand on paper are 25% quicker at note-taking tasks than those who use digital technology. ~ NeuroscienceNews.com

Here are some other reasons putting pen to paper, is still a smart move!

1. The best way to increase the odds of achieving your goals is to write them down.

Research has shown only three out of 10 people write down their goals; and yet that 30 percent has been found to achieve more than the other 70 percent combined.

2. If you write it out in longhand, you’re more likely to remember it.

Studies have found the act of touching pen to paper allows you to recall what you’re writing in a way that touching a keyboard does not.

3. A handwritten sentence holds more permanence than one typed on a screen.

Sometimes we need to read our initial thoughts in order to gain a deeper understanding of the intended result. You can’t hit the backspace button on a notepad; nor can you hit one on life.

4. There are fewer disruptions available when writing on pen and paper.

We all know that when you want to get something done, the first step is avoiding the Internet. When writing longhand, you shut out the temptations of checking social media feeds, sports scores or the latest celebrity gossip.

5. Written lists allow a more tangible way of tracking success.

Fellow list-writers understand there are few things as satisfying as placing a physical checkmark beside an item on a to-do list. Written lists and goals enable you to see and celebrate your progress.