First Sit and Stand Experience: A Week Long Study


Hello everyone,

Nem here, the Web Marketing Specialist. Hope your journey to a healthier workplace is going according to plan. As part of this month’s workplace wellness blog we thought it would be worthwhile to do a mini-study on myself, by myself (not sure if this one will be a part of any peer reviewed journals) with regards to the sit and stand workstations.

Sit & Stand Workstation Study

Many of us at our office got outfitted with these options and we’ve been trying to implement a good balance between sitting and standing. My personal goal was to reach a 50-50 balance. And as a little background on my daily activity; I do not do much moving around – my tasks consist mainly of working on the computer, unless we have to move tables, throw out old equipment or carry stuff into the storage room (Raf, the graphic designer and I are the internal moving team). The only times I get up are for lunch, grabbing coffee or restroom breaks.

 

 

Below is a chart where you will find my sitting vs. standing schedule over a week. You will notice I only hit that goal once during the week, and as a first timer using a sit & stand extension I think that is not too bad. Most of the time I would forget to stand (caught up in doing work) and then I would have to make up the time by standing for prolonged periods of time as opposed to doing timely and balanced intervals.

Weekly Chart: Sitting vs. Standing

Summary of my experiences during this week:

1. Making a daily schedule of when to sit and stand helps remind you to actually stand.

We all get caught up in our responsibilities and our brains have been basically wired to sit (if your job is computer heavy like mine) at work. I made a schedule for each day and followed it (for the most part) to gradually increase my standing time.

2. Doing short intervals between sitting and standing is much better than trying to stand or sit for longer periods.

When I would sit for too long, I tried to balance it out by standing for the same (if not longer) amount of time. Let me tell you, your feet get sore! It’s not too bad but at some point you start to lean on one leg, then the other to avoid soreness. I found myself shuffling my feet, anything but to stay stationary. We even got a Steppie (balancing board for your feet while you stand, it rocks left and right) that I used but it elevated me past my monitors so I went back to alternating my legs while standing. Short intervals > long periods of time.

3. My focus increased while standing.

Usually I would lock in and chip away at a specific task continuously. Perhaps it was the increased blood flow as the manufacturers claim, or it could have been the fact that when you stand to work it’s almost like raising your hand in class. You are put on the spot to answer (or ask a question) and “everyone” is watching. Probably a little subconscious trick of the brain to get you into another gear.

4. Another interesting thing I found is that if any of my colleagues near me were standing, we would be more collaborative (or communicative).

Being eye level with someone (as opposed to being separated by a cubicle wall) made it easier to ask a question directly while working instead of sending an email and waiting for a response. Actually the same case can be made for colleagues in different locations of the office. I found myself walking over and having a conversation (assuming they were not busy or in meetings) regarding certain tasks as opposed to just emailing back and forth.

5. First thing in the morning and first thing after lunch were NOT my standing times.

I would usually take the 1st hour after coming into the office and about 30-45 minutes after lunch to sit. Any other time of the day was fair game.


So there you have it – my initial experiences with the sit & stand workstation on the road to a healthier workday. I would love to hear if anyone else has had a similar or different experience using one of these. I would also be very interested in hearing from people who don’t necessarily work at a computer all day – do you find sitting breaks necessary sometimes?

It’s World Backup Day! Everything You Need to Know About Data Backup


Happy World Backup Day!

Never heard of it? Don’t worry, you’re probably not alone. World backup day is slowly gaining popularity. There is no surprise of its ever-increasing popularity considering the amount of data that gets lost or corrupted each year. We are sure you’ve lost an important document or file at some point in your life.

Well, fortunately for you we’ve come up with this handy guide on how and why you should regularly backup your data!

What Is Data Backup?

Data backup is the process of making extra copies of all of your important data such as documents, photos and so on and storing them somewhere secure in case the originals ever get lost or damaged. For an even more secure backup, make three copies of your files in case your first two ever malfunction.

Why Should You Backup Your Data?

Everyone should take the time to back up their data because you never really know when your computer could crash, your phone get stolen, or you accidentally delete a file and lose it forever. By creating another copy of all your important data you never have to worry about it getting lost or being destroyed.

Eye-opening facts from worldbackupday.com:

  • 30% of people have never backup up their files!
  • 113 phones are lost or stolen every minute
  • 29% of disasters are caused by accident
  • 1 in 10 computers are infected with viruses each month

How To Backup Your Data?

Backing up your data is neither as hard or time consuming as you may think. But most importantly, it can save you from a lot of stress and heartache in the future if your files are ever compromised. First, you need to decide whether you want to back up your data online or to an external drive. (It is strongly recommended to start backing up to an external drive then make another copy online).

Backing up to an External/USB Drive

You will need: an external hard drive, storage size will depend on the amount of information and data you are backing up. Common options range from 8GB (gigabytes – light storage) to 6TB (terabytes – heavy storage).

Windows

Follow these steps to tell your computer start backing up your work automatically every hour:

  1. Plug your drive or its cable into your USB port.
  2. Click the pop-up notification that says, Tap to choose what happens with removable drives.
  3. Select the Configure this Drive for Backup option; when the File History window appears, click the Turn On button.Windows Backup Steps
  4. Open the Control Panel.
  5. Select the System and Security category and click File History.
  6. If you need to switch the drive, click the Select Drive link from the window’s left side and select a different drive.
  7. Click the Turn On button.

Mac

  1. Set up Time Machine. (Time Machine is the built-in backup feature of OS X.)
  2. When you connect an external hard drive directly to your Mac, you might be asked if you want to use the drive to back up with Time Machine. Click “Use as Backup Disk.”

If Time Machine doesn’t ask you to choose a backup disk:

  1. Open Time Machine preferences from the Time Machine menu in the menu bar. Or choose Apple menu > System Preferences, then click Time Machine.
  2. Click Select Backup Disk.
  3. Select an external hard drive, Time Capsule, or other storage solution from the list, then click Use Disk.
  4. After you choose a backup disk, optionally click “Add or Remove Backup Disk” to add more backup disks for extra security and convenience.

After you set up Time Machine, it automatically makes hourly backups for the past 24 hours, daily backups for the past month, and weekly backups for all previous months. The oldest backups are deleted when your backup drive is full.

Backing up online

Although you shouldn’t backup your entire hard drive onto a cloud-storage service, you can use these services to preserve your important files. There are a number of different cloud-storage services you can choose from, some free, some paid. A few notable ones to look into include:

  • Google Drive (15GB Free)
  • Dropbox (2GB Free)
  • OneDrive (5GB Free)
  • SugarSync (5GB Free)

Once you’ve signed up for an online storage website, simply start uploading all of your important files. The benefit of storing online is that you can access it from any computer, anytime. You can also easily share and collaborate with others. There are also options to pay for more storage if the amount of free storage offered is not enough.

What You Should Back Up

Ultimately you should backup all of the files that are important to you and that are irreplaceable. If you still don’t know where to start, take a look at the following areas according to a MakeUseOf article:

Personal Files

This will include things you’ve created such as documents and things that you have purchased such as music and movies. So check your Documents, Pictures and Videos folders. Setting it up so that these folders are automatically backed up as a whole rather than picking and choosing files is ideal.

Personal FIles - Backup

Desktop

If you are in the habit of saving all of your projects that you are currently working on onto your desktop, this is another place you should be sure to back up. This way, you don’t have to worry about losing these projects and having to start from scratch and losing valuable time.

Desktop Backup

Browser Data

Don’t forget about all of the bookmarks and favorites in your browsers. Often we collect these over a large amount of time and don’t want to lose these so it’s a good idea to keep a second copy. Additionally, you probably have quite a few extensions and other browser settings you wouldn’t want to manually install once more.

Browser Data Backup

Emails

Backing up e-mails is often overlooked, but it’s a good idea to keep backups of your e-mails for your personal records especially any important business e-mails or receipts.

Email Backup

Avoid Using these Job Interview Answers


During interviews, we all try to tell the potential employer that we are a perfect fit for the position because we work hard and are team players. As great as this sounds, it doesn’t make you stand out from anyone else applying for that position. Here are 5 interview clichés to avoid:

Avoiding Answers at Job Interview

“I’m hard working”

That’s great to know, but the candidate that was just interviewed 20 minutes ago most likely said the exact same thing. Instead of just saying you’re a hard worker, tell the interviewer how you’re a hard worker and give examples of things you have done that prove you to be a hard worker. Stand out from the others by telling the interviewer that you get results.

“I’m a team player”

You aren’t going to say that you don’t work well with others, so potential employers won’t be convinced by this phrase. Instead, let them know of teams you have built and worked with and explain how you contributed in that group. As well, this is a perfect opportunity to slip in a conflict that you were able to resolve within the team.

“I work too hard”

When you’re asked what your weakness is, don’t say that you work too hard. Also, don’t say that you’re a perfectionist either; this is one of the top answers so make up something else. Give the interviewer a real weakness of yours but make sure that it isn’t too incriminating of a weakness. For example, if you’re applying for an accounting position, don’t say you’re bad with numbers; say something like you aren’t very good at speaking up in meetings” and let them know what you are doing to overcome this weakness.

“I’m open to anything”

Don’t tell this to a potential employer. It sounds desperate and employers don’t like that. Instead of saying this, explain why you want this job as opposed to any other job. It shows you are passionate for their company rather than just getting a job.

“I’m perfect for this position”

This is exactly what you want the employer to know, but you can’t say it just like that. Instead, demonstrate how perfect you are for the company with your success stories and show them that you researched both the role and company in depth. Talk about the company and how important the things they do are to you, this is just a fancier way of saying “I will fit in” and will no doubt stand you apart from the rest.

View original article here.