How Physical Activity Can Improve Your Life


As we all know, it is important for us to be active to improve our health. But what we might not know is what exactly physical activity does for our bodies. As said in this document, we need to try to fit in as much physical activity as we can. Adults should be getting 30 minutes of moderate activity every day to meet the body’s requirements.

Moderate Jogging

Here is what physical activity does to our bodies:

  • Helps to prevent heart disease and breast, uterus, and colon cancers
  • Strengthens your lungs and helps them work more efficiently
  • Tones and strengthens muscles
  • Builds stamina
  • Keeps your joints in a good condition
  • Improves balance
  • May slow bone loss
  • Improves energy
  • Helps with relaxation and stress
  • Allows for better sleep
  • Helps you feel more lively
  • Improves your mood

As we can see, there are many benefits of physical activity, and each one helps improve both our personal and work lives. It can help us become more efficient workers as stress is easier to handle, our moods will be improved, and fatigue won’t slow us down. There are also many ways to be able to meet the daily 30 minutes without having to go for a run. Some examples of moderate activities include:

  • Housework – that’s right, vacuuming the house does count towards your daily physical activity!
  • Gardening and yard work
  • Stretching
  • Hiking and walking
  • Biking
  • Dancing
  • Weight lifting
  • Golfing

Most of these activities can also be considered vigorous activities depending on how intense the activity is. Most sports are considered vigorous activities as well as yoga and pilates. You can go even further and fit in exercise during work as well, check out our previous post on ways to exercise at work to get some ideas. Exercise is enjoyable for all, so try to find a sport or an activity that you enjoy and give your body the exercise it needs!

 

How to Fit in Exercise at the Office


As we lead such busy lives, fitting in a daily workout can become quite the challenge. However, squeezing in targeted exercises a few times a day is better than skipping an entire workout. Here are a few exercises you can do at the office (suggested by this article):

In the Elevator

As we all have heard, you can get some exercise in by taking the stairs instead of the elevator. However, taking the stairs isn’t always the most ideal when heading to a meeting. Instead, try doing wall sits in the elevator by pressing your back against the wall, dropping to a 90 degree sitting position, and holding the pose for the duration of the elevator ride. Wall sits are great for working your quadriceps, glutes, and core.

 In the Restroom

While washing your hands, rest your forearms on the counter and do single leg squats. Life one leg off of the ground and bend into a squat position with the other leg, making sure the knee doesn’t go too far over the toes. Do 10 squats per leg.

 At your Desk

leg exercise at office work - standing man reading at tablet

While sitting at your desk, or even at a meeting, you can do ab vacuums to build strength in the deep abdominal muscles that support your posture and aid in stability. Draw your abdominals in, pulling the naval towards the spine, and hold for a count of three then release. Another exercise you can do at your desk is leg raises. Sit at the back of your chair and bring your legs up and lower them without allowing your feet to touch the floor. Start with sets of 12 then gradually increase up to sets of 20. Leg raises work the lower part of the abdominal wall, close to where the belt buckle is. As for arms, try some tricep dips at the end of your chair. Scoot off of the chair, hold on to the end of the chair (your arms should be behind your body), and lower your body.

 In the Car

Ab vacuums can not only be done at a desk, but they can be done in the car as well. For an arm workout, try isometric contractions. Hold the bottom of the steering wheel, flex your biceps and hold for a few seconds. For triceps, hold the top of the steering wheel then flex and hold your triceps.

At the Airport

Squeeze in some cardio by walking around the airport. Many airports have walking paths, yoga rooms, and even full-service gyms for travelers to utilize.

 

How to Handle Stress


We all lead busy lives so it is important that we take responsibility of our health and learn how to cope with stress when it hits. There are four pillars of health – mental, physical, financial and career – that each person needs to keep in balance. It will make a large impact on a person if two of the four pillars are in negative territory which results in a drop of productivity.

The first step in keeping balance is to build resilience by exercising, eating properly, and spending time in nature. If you are able to build resilience, you will have more psychological wellness and if you are hit by stress, you won’t be impacted as hard. Another thing you can do is check out your company’s employee assistance program to get a rating for your health. The program helps to find the aspects of a person’s life that are causing stress. Once the cause is determined, the company’s employee assistance program can provide you with the help you need, such as a councilor or financial planner.

Businessman Dealing With Stress

Three steps to reduce day-to-day stress:

1. Learn tactics to reduce stress

If you find that you are stressed because of a large list of tasks you have to complete or by a large project, try breaking them into smaller chunks and tackle each task one at a time. Typically when a person is able to check off finished work at a relatively fast rate, they start to feel more productive and less stressed.

2. Deal immediately with a tough task

It’s best to tackle a tough task as soon as possible, as we tend to let our heads get the best of us. Instead of waiting until the end of the day to deal with your “to-do” project, deal with it as early as you can. By dealing with tasks right away, we save ourselves a day of stress and worrying.

3. Know when to ask for help

Don’t be afraid to ask for help when you’re feeling stressed and aren’t sure what to do. There will always be someone willing to help.

Seven steps to building resilience

1. Exercise

Exercise is always important, especially when stressed. It helps to clear your mind and get rid of stress by allowing you to calm your breathing. Exercises such as yoga and streching helpsthe body and mind relax.

Try starting off with going for a half-hour walk every day. If you feel stressed during work, take some time out of your lunch break to take a walk. If you’re able to, try to arrange walking meetings or have a friendly office competition by having all colleagues wear pedometers and see who can take the most steps in a week.

2. Eat right

Make sure you’re eating the proper amount of food and nutrients your body needs. You don’t want to be under eating or overeating as that can make an impact on stress and lead to other problems.

3. Get enough sleep

Everything is harder when we are running on little sleep, so it is important to get quality sleep every night.

4. Spend time with friends and family

Take the time to spend time with friends as family as they can help take your mind off of the every day routine and make you feel better overall.

5. Spend time in nature

Spending time in nature allows us to refocus, relax, and get away from technology and other collaborative means of staying “connected” to everything.

6. Focus on spirituality

Whether through organized religion, star-gazing, meditating or simply time spent contemplating life, give yourself a chance to stop and think about topics beyond the daily routine.

7. Be involved with your community

Helping others helps us feel better about ourselves.